Frequently Asked Questions

 
What is the difference between coaching and consulting?

This is a common question. A coach is someone who will work with you to help you achieve your goals. However, at all times you are the one executing, with the coach’s guidance, assistance and support. Think of it as helping you learn how to fish. A consultant is someone who will work with you to achieve your goals and if need be will do it for you. This is like having someone fish for you. Here is a link to further clarify: http://www.501commons.org/resources/tools-and-best-practices/management-leadership/whats-the-difference-between-coaching-and-consulting

What can I gain from having a coach?

Like all great athletes, everyone needs a coach from time-to-time to help them perform and often exceed their self-imposed limits. A coach help you achieve goals and objectives that you may find it difficult to achieve on your own. The following Harvard Business Review (HBR) article from 2009 explains the benefits of coaching, differences between coaching and therapy, and even the costs. Here is the link: https://hbr.org/2009/01/what-can-coaches-do-for-you

Who is your typical client?
My primary focus is on helping owners and senior leaders of small/mid-sized businesses produce remarkable results while becoming happier and more successful in all aspects of their work and life. I have three sets of ideal clients:

  1. Executives who want to enhance their leadership effectiveness in order to grow their career or improve team dynamics
  2. Small/mid-sized business owners who want to grow their business and become more profitable
  3. Individuals who want to better manage stress and enhance how they resolve conflict
Your approach talks about “centeredness”. What is centeredness?
Centeredness is a philosophy which aligns your physical, intellectual, and emotional strengths to drive achievement. It can be applied in many aspects of life. My approach to coaching uses centeredness as the foundation to helping you achieve your goals. The consulting firm and thought leader McKinsey has started looking at this as you can see in the following article:

http://www.mckinsey.com/insights/leading_in_the_21st_century/centered_leadership_how_talented_women_thrive

What does it mean “to be centered”?

This is one where there have been books written and still the definition can be elusive. From my perspective being centered equates to having physical, mental, emotional and spiritual alignment which results in a calm and harmonious state of mind even when surrounded by stress and chaos. Think of it like being in the eye of a hurricane, one is calm and collected, able to deal with whatever life throws at them from a place of tranquility, all the while surrounded by the swirling winds of life.

What is “transition effectiveness” and how does it differ from change management?

Transition effectiveness is how well a business or individual moves from their current state to a more desired state. It differs from change because change can happen any time. Change management focuses on adapting to an event that induces the necessity to change. It is therefore reactive in nature. Transition effectiveness is done with intent often without or before an event that requires change. It is therefore proactive in nature.

How does centeredness differ from mindfulness?

Mindfulness focuses on being present in the here-and-now. It is a component of centeredness, but the philosophy of centeredness comprises a broader philosophy including positive thinking, optimism, and flow.

What is the difference between “optimism” and “positive thinking”?

Optimism focuses on keeping a positive outlook. Not to be Pollyannaish, but generally positive. Positive thinking compliments this by and is characterized by not personalizing negative or stressful events. Positive thinking and optimism are closely related and both have been demonstrated to have a positive influence on one’s transition effectiveness, sometimes also referred to as resilience.

What is flow?

Flow simply put is when one is so involved with an activity they forget everything else, hunger, fatigue, time, etc. Think of this as “being in the zone”. When in a state of flow a person enters a different level of experience which has been demonstrated to enhance how one deals with life’s challenges such as stress and conflict.

Why is this based on Aikido vs. another martial art?

There is no intent to hold Aikido out as being any better / worse than any other martial art. They are all great in their own ways. My approach is based on Aikido for two reasons. First, it is an art that has strong meaning for me and in which I have deep expertise. Second, Aikido is ideal because of its non-aggressive philosophy and its natural integration of the elements of positive thinking, optimism, mindfulness and flow. To learn more try here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KYapRGzfoU0


Don’t see your question?  Feel free to email me and ask: mark@centeredbusinessconsulting.com